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What really happened during the Civil War?  The answer lies in the letters, diaries and journals of farmers, housewives, nurses, clerks, privates, chaplains, teachers, sergeants, nuns and nurses.  My three books avoid generals and politicians and use the common ‘voice’ to tell the story of our greatest conflict.  This is history as it should be told . . . from the bottom looking up . . . by the participants.

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Vol. 1 – 2006 – No Soap, No Pay, Diarrhea, Dysentery & Desertion – A Composite Diary of the Last 16 Months of the Confederacy 1864-1865.  Available in 6×9 quality paperback and ebook, 497 pages.

Vol. 2 – 2009 – Send Me a Pair of Old Boots & Kiss My Little Girls – The Civil War Letters of Richard and Mary Watkins, 1861-1865.  Available in 6×9 quality paperback and ebook, 394 pages.

Vol. 3 – 2012 – Mama, I Am Yet Still Alive – A Composite Diary of 1863 in the Confederacy.  Available in 6×9 quality paperback and ebook, 464 pages.

All three books are told in the ‘first person’ using excerpts from the diaries, letters and journals of common soldiers and civilians. In Diarrhea and Mama these voices come from every state in the Confederacy, prison camps in the North and ships at sea.  Boots & Kisses is an edited collection of more than 300 letters between a Confederate cavalry Captain and his wife.

In all three books the ‘voices’ tell the story.  I serve as their editor and introduce the chapters.  I will give occasional editorial comment at the end of an excerpt to explain that consumption is now called tuberculosis or how many sheets of paper are in a quire.  You will not have a historian giving you his opinion but rather you will be reading first person thoughts from our forebears and forming your own opinion.  You will form personal relationships with some of the ‘voices.’  Their name, the date, where they are writing from and their command or job introduces each excerpt.  As they appear their second and third times you will begin to pay more attention to each writer before reading his or her excerpt.

The simple magic and power of their ‘voices’ is spellbinding.